Featured in the Courier Mail

Recently Rishi was interviewed by Julie Sanderson of Newscorp and the article has popped up in the Southern Star as well as the Courier Mail. You can read the article online if you subscribe to the Courier Mail: How not to be ripped off buying poor hand sanitiser. Alternatively, continue reading below for a few […]

Recently Rishi was interviewed by Julie Sanderson of Newscorp and the article has popped up in the Southern Star as well as the Courier Mail.

You can read the article online if you subscribe to the Courier Mail: How not to be ripped off buying poor hand sanitiser.

Alternatively, continue reading below for a few highlights. Rishi set the record straight on the challenges of hand sanitiser production at a time when production costs have risen, and numerous businesses have begun to produce hand sanitiser in less than satisfactory ways.

From the article:

“You can legally make a hand sanitiser with 5 or 10 per cent alcohol, that smells like its got alcohol in it, but it won’t kill COVID-19,” Dr Shah said.

Dr Shah, who holds several degrees including a Masters in Veterinary Science and qualifications in regulatory science said the labelling ideally would include a percentage of alcohol (or ethanol) and standards compliance information.

A claim of “killing 99.9 per cent of germs” was also a good sign.He said buying known brands from established retailers was less likely to result in a poor purchase and bottles should at least have an ingredients list and a batch number.

Dr Shah said consumers should ask for a Safety Data Sheet for the product, particularly when buying online, which would give adequate safety and compliance information.

Dr Shah said buying a hospital product provided no advantage to a regular consumer. Hand sanitiser for hospital use, which would kill COVID-19, contained 80 per cent alcohol, a tiny amount of peroxide, glycerine and purified water.

On the issue of increased hand sanitiser costs:

Part of the problem is a tripling and quadrupling in the costs of the ethanol and raw materials needed to make hand sanitisers onan industrial scale.

“It leaves those of us making a high-quality product with high costs to cover, and I’ve been accused of price gouging because the price is now higher than it was,” Dr Shah said.

“Even with these higher costs taken into account, the current retail price of a hand sanitiser that meets all the standards should cost no more than $5-6 for 50ml, or about $25 for 500ml.”